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Bredehoft, Thomas A. The Visible Text. Textual Production and Reproduction from Beowulf to Maus. (Oxford Textual Perspectives.) New York: Oxford Univ. Press, 2014. (182 S.) 
Added by: joachim (05 Sep 2014 09:43:31 UTC)   Last edited by: joachim (18 Oct 2014 13:13:04 UTC)
Resource type: Book
Languages: englisch
ID no. (ISBN etc.): 978-0-19-960316-9
BibTeX citation key: Bredehoft2014
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Categories: General
Keywords: "Jimmy Corrigan", "Maus", Literatur, Materialität, Mittelalter, Paratext, Produktion, Spiegelman. Art, USA, Visuelle Kultur, Ware. Chris
Creators: Bredehoft
Publisher: Oxford Univ. Press (New York)
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Abstract
Covering materials ranging from Anglo-Saxon manuscripts and inscribed objects to contemporary comics, The Visible Text rewrites the history of textual media and technologies. Arguing that media are not defined by technologies alone, but by a combination of technologies and the ideas that people hold about those technologies, Bredehoft identifies four distinct periods or domains in the history of English literature that correspond to four ways in which media ideologies interacted with the two basic defining technologies of manuscripts and printed books.
Examining two complementary ways of defining texts (as subject to a reproductive medium, on the one hand, and as surrounded and defined by paratexts, on the other), The Visible Text points out how Anglo-Saxon manuscripts and contemporary comics share a remarkable similarity in being structured as productions rather than reproductions.
Contrastingly, the late-medieval and print-era periods share a cultural investment in textual reproduction, but they differ both in their characteristic technologies and in how they conceptualize the object of reproduction itself. A final epilogue, briefly considering the nature of electronically-mediated textuality, highlights the importance of understanding the history addressed here, as electronic text both parallels and departs from typographic print in ways that earlier reproductive domains clarify and complicate.

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations (x)

Introduction (1)
1. Anglo-Saxon Textual Production (23)
Interlude 1 Anglo-Saxon to Gothic (58)
2. Gothic Textual Reproduction (61)
Interlude 2 Gothic to Print (95)
3. Typographic Print Reproduction (97)
Interlude 3 Print to Comics (126)
4. Comics Textual Production (130)
Epilogue (157)

Bibliography (169)
Index (177)


  
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