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Heimermann, Mark: "Old before their time. The impossibility of childhood innocence in The Walking Dead." In: Journal of Graphic Novels and Comics 5.3 (2014), S. 266–283. 
Added by: joachim (11 Sep 2014 08:50:09 UTC)   Last edited by: joachim (11 Sep 2014 10:44:23 UTC)
Resource type: Journal Article
Languages: englisch
DOI: 10.1080/21504857.2014.916328
BibTeX citation key: Heimermann2014
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Categories: General
Keywords: "The Walking Dead", Adlard. Charlie, Horrorcomic, Kirkman. Robert, USA
Creators: Heimermann
Collection: Journal of Graphic Novels and Comics
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Abstract
Many in Western culture see childhood as innocent and children as pure, even though this is often not the case. Because of this inaccurate view, many contemporary narratives push back against the feasibility of maintaining childhood innocence. One such narrative is Robert Kirkman’s serialised comic book The Walking Dead, in which children are exposed to potentially traumatic events, like death and violence, on a daily basis. The comic book juxtaposes images and situations containing children and youth against the horrific environment in which the characters find themselves, often with devastating results. These juxtapositions demonstrate the impossibility of maintaining innocence in a dangerous world. The child Carl’s rapid movement towards adulthood is also analogous to the transition towards more adult content in comic books. The movement towards more adult content in a form that some thought was, or should be, strictly for children is, in some ways, representative of the futility in attempting to shelter children from adult content.
  
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