Bonner Online-Bibliographie zur Comicforschung

WIKINDX Resources

Yockey, Matt (Hrsg.): Make Ours Marvel. Media Convergence and a Comics Universe. (World Comics and Graphic Nonfiction.) Austin: Univ. of Texas Press, 2017. (358 S.) 
Added by: joachim (17 Feb 2017 16:11:44 UTC)   Last edited by: joachim (08 Jul 2017 16:51:28 UTC)
Resource type: Book
Languages: englisch
ID no. (ISBN etc.): 978-1-4773-1249-0
BibTeX citation key: Yockey2017
Email resource to friend
View all bibliographic details
Categories: General
Keywords: Adaption, Aufsatzsammlung, Comic-Verfilmung, Marvel, USA
Creators: Yockey
Publisher: Univ. of Texas Press (Austin)
Views: 23/144
Views index: 42%
Popularity index: 10.5%
Attachments  
Abstract
The creation of the Fantastic Four effectively launched the Marvel Comics brand in 1961. Within ten years, the introduction (or reintroduction) of characters such as Spider-Man, the Hulk, Iron Man, Captain America, and the X-Men catapulted Marvel past its primary rival, DC Comics, for domination of the comic book market. Since the 2000s, the company’s iconic characters have leaped from page to screens with the creation of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, which includes everything from live-action film franchises of Iron Man and the Avengers to television and streaming media, including the critically acclaimed Netflix series Daredevil and Jessica Jones. Marvel, now owned by Disney, has clearly found the key to transmedia success.
Make Ours Marvel traces the rise of the Marvel brand and its transformation into a transmedia empire over the past fifty years. A dozen original essays range across topics such as how Marvel expanded the notion of an all-star team book with The Avengers, which provided a roadmap for the later films, to the company’s attempts to create lasting female characters and readerships, to its regular endeavors to reinvigorate its brand while still maintaining the stability that fans crave. Demonstrating that the secret to Marvel’s success comes from adeptly crossing media boundaries while inviting its audience to participate in creating Marvel’s narrative universe, this book shows why the company and its characters will continue to influence storytelling and transmedia empire building for the foreseeable future.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments (vii)

Matt Yockey: Introduction. Excelsior! Or, Everything That Rises Must Converge (1)

1. Mark Minett and Bradley Schauer: Reforming the “Justice” System: Marvel’s Avengers and the Transformation of the All-Star Team Book (39)
2. Henry Jenkins: Man Without Fear: David Mack, Daredevil, and the “Bounds of Difference” in Superhero Comics (66)
3. Anna F. Peppard: “This Female Fights Back!”: A Feminist History of Marvel Comics (105)
4. Derek Johnson: “Share Your Universe”: Generation, Gender, and the Future of Marvel Publishing (138)
5. Deron Overpeck: Breaking Brand: From NuMarvel to MarvelNOW! Marvel Comics in the Age of Media Convergence (164)
6. Darren Wershler and Kalervo A. Sinervo: Marvel and the Form of Motion Comics (187)
7. Felix Brinker: Transmedia Storytelling in the “Marvel Cinematic Universe” and the Logics of Convergence-Era Popular Seriality (207)
8. Michael Graves: The Marvel One-Shots and Transmedia Storytelling (234)
9. James N. Gilmore: Spinning Webs: Constructing Authors, Genre, and Fans in the Spider-Man Film Franchise (248)
10. Aaron Taylor: Playing Peter Parker: Spider-Man and Superhero Film Performance (268)
11. Dru Jeffries: Spotting Stan: The Fun and Function of Stan Lee’s Cameos in the Marvel Universe(s) (297)
12. William Proctor: Schrödinger’s Cape: The Quantum Seriality of the Marvel Multiverse (319)

Notes on Contributors (347)
Index (351)


  
wikindx 5.2.beta 1 ©2017 | Total resources: 10830 | Username: -- | Bibliography: WIKINDX Master Bibliography | Style: Comicforschung-Bibliographie Stil (CFB) | Database queries: 52 | DB execution: 0.35272 secs | Script execution: 0.37200 secs