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Jüngst, Heike Elisabeth: Information Comics. Knowledge Transfer in a Popular Format. (Leipziger Studien zur angewandten Linguistik und Translatologie, 7.) Frankfurt am Main [etc.]: Peter Lang, 2010. (365 S.) 
Added by: joachim (09 Oct 2010 20:06:18 UTC)   
Resource type: Book
Languages: englisch
ID no. (ISBN etc.): 978-3-631-59958-7
BibTeX citation key: Jungst2010
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Categories: General
Keywords: Sachcomics
Creators: Jüngst
Publisher: Peter Lang (Frankfurt am Main [etc.])
Views: 5/267
Views index: 3%
Popularity index: 0.75%
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Abstract
Information Comics can be found all over the world. They cover all kinds of topics, address all kinds of audience and reflect all kinds of text genres. This book offers an overview on standard structures, experimental designs and general trends. The comics are analysed according to their genre and narrative structure; the introductory chapters deal with picture design, verbal text in comics and word-picture relationships. The book also contains an extensive bibliography of primary and secondary sources.

Table of Contents

0 Introduction: Scope and Purpose of this Book (1)
0.1 Hypothesis. Placing the Study (2)
0.1.1 Literature Used for Analysis (2)
0.1.2 Emotion and Information (4)
0.2 Method Used (5)
0.3 Layout of the Book (9)
0.4 The Textual Corpus (9)

1 Defining the Information Comic (11)
1.1 Medium – Format – Genre (11)
1.1.1 Properties of the Comics Format (11)
1.1.2 The Prototypical Comic (14)
1.2 The Information Comic – A Definition (15)
1.2.1 Information Comics and Information Books (16)
1.2.2 Types of Expert to Non-Expert Texts (17)
1.2.3 The Term “Information Comic” (18)
1.3 Fuzzy Edges of the Educational Comic (20)
1.3.1 Content: Works of Literature as Content (20)
1.3.2 Purpose: Learning-to-Read Comics (21)
1.3.3 Style: Hybrid Formats (22)
1.3.3.1 Collage Style (22)
1.3.3.2 Picture-book style (23)
1.3.3.3 Entertainment Comics with an Educational Bias (25)
1.3.3.4 Books with Comics Sections (25)
1.4 Uses of Information Comics (26)
1.5 Information Comics and Their Appearance in Various Media (26)
1.5.1 The Brochure (27)
1.5.2 The Book (27)
1.5.3 Postcards, Posters, Flyers (28)
1.5.4. The Series (28)
1.5.5 Appearance within a Comics Series (28)
1.5.6 Appearance in Magazines (29)
1.5.7 Information Comics on the Internet (29)
1.6 Literature Survey: Educational and Information Comics (30)
1.6.1 Defining Information Comics (31)
1.6.2 Categorizing Information Comics (32)
1.6.3 Topic- and Publication-oriented Research (33)
1.6.4 Historical and Geographical Overviews (34)
1.6.5 Effects of Information Comics (35)
1.6.6 Designing Information Comics (36)
1.6.7 Information Comics and Teaching (37)
1.6.8 Bibliographies (38)
1.6.9 Other Information about Information Comics (38)

2 Aspects of Popularisation (39)
2.1 Popularisation. A Working Definition (40)
2.2 Experts and Non-Experts: The Mediators (43)
2.2.1 The Expert as Author (44)
2.2.2 The Author as Researcher (45)
2.2.3 Authors and Advisors (46)
2.3 Attention-grabbing as a Prerequisite for Popularisation (47)
2.3.1 The Cover as a Signal (49)
2.3.2 The First Page (51)
2.4 Advantages and Disadvantages of the Format (53)
2.4.1 Comics and Positive Associations (53)
2.4.2 “Inherent Popularisation” and the Format Components (55)
2.4.3 Narrative Structure (57)
2.4.4 The Problematic Sides of Information Comics (58)
2.4.5 Political Activism and the Danger of Propaganda (61)
2.5 The Role of Comics in Teaching and Learning (62)
2.6 Preferred Contents (65)
2.6.1 Introductions (66)
2.6.2 Overexposed Topics (67)
2.6.3 Difficult Topics Made Easy (67)
2.7 Defining Target Groups (68)
2.7.1 Interest in the Topic (69)
2.7.2 Age (70)
2.7.3 Weak Readers as a Sub Target Group (70)
2.7.4 The Author's Relation to the Target Group (72)
2.8 Strategies of Popularisation (73)
2.8.1 Simplification and Prior Knowledge (73)
2.8.2 Personalisation: Situation, Experts and Focalisers (74)
2.8.2.1 The Focaliser (76)
2.8.2.1.1 Bases for Identification (77)
2.8.2.1.2 Readers' Attitudes Towards Focalisers (79)
2.8.2.1.3 Focaliser Involvement (81)
2.8.2.2 The Expert (83)
2.8.2.2.1 Trained vs. Experienced (83)
2.8.2.2.2 Experts with a Comics Origin (85)
2.8.2.2.3 Mascots as Experts (86)
2.8.2.3 Focaliser-Expert Relationships (88)
2.8.2.4 The Expert as a Structuring Element (88)
2.8.2.5 Other Characters (88)
2.8.3 Entertainment (88)
2.9 Hidden Agendas (89)
2.9.1 Character Design (89)
2.9.1.1 Gender (90)
2.9.1.2 Race and Religion (91)
2.9.1.3 Age (92)
2.9.1.4 Disability (94)
2.9.2 Social Behaviour (94)
2.9.2.1 Mirroring the Real World (95)
2.9.2.2 Offering a Utopia (95)
2.10 Democratisation and Mode of Distribution (96)
2.10.1 Public Display (96)
2.10.2 Ordering Free Comics (97)
2.10.3 Information Comics for Sale (97)
Conclusion of Chapter Two (97)

3 The Components of the Comics Format (99)
3.1 Verbal Text and the Format (100)
3.1.1 The Restricted Space: Captions and Speech Balloons (100)
3.1.2 The Lettering (104)
3.1.3 Legibility and Translation (107)
3.1.4 Index and Table of Contents (110)
3.1.5 The Material Side: Paper (110)
3.2 Comics-specific Pictorial Elements (111)
3.2.1 Onomatopoeia (111)
3.2.2 Special Symbols (112)
3.3 The Page (112)
3.3.1 The Panels (112)
3.3.2 The Page Layout (113)
3.4 Sequentiality (115)
3.5 Transfer Examples (116)
Conclusion of Chapter Three (120)

4 The Verbal Text (121)
4.1 Captions, Balloons and Onomatopoeia (122)
4.1.1 Approximating Spoken Language in Comics (123)
4.2 Informative Use of Language (128)
4.2.1 Explanations, Terminology and Genre (130)
4.2.1.1 Outsourcing Terminology and Explanations (131)
4.2.1.2 Repetition (132)
4.2.2 Typical Verbal Text Topics (134)
4.2.3 Typical Verbal Text Structures (137)
4.2.3.1 Monologue Structures (140)
4.2.4 Explanations and the Role of the Expert (141)
4.3 Emotive Use of Language (142)
4.3.1 Emotive Quality of Spoken Language (143)
4.3.2 Using Emotive Elements of Spoken Language (144)
4.3.3 Character-specific Language (146)
4.3.4 Addressing the Reader (148)
4.3.5 Comics-specific Devices to Underline Emotive Language (151)
4.3.5.1 Humanizing Extras for Complex Explanations (153)
4.4 Entertaining Language (155)
4.5 Expressive Use of Language (157)
Conclusion of Chapter Four (157)

5 The Pictures (159)
5.1 The Material Basis (161)
5.1.1 Black and White (161)
5.1.2 Colour Drawings (162)
5.2 Structural Categories (163)
5.2.1 Panel Structure and Composition (163)
5.2.2 Function within a Sequence (168)
5.2.3 Degree of Iconicity (169)
5.2.4 Pictures and Genres (171)
5.2.5 Avoiding Pictures and the Pictorial Overkill (171)
5.3 Types of Pictures (172)
5.3.1 Primarily Emotive Pictures (172)
5.3.2 Balanced Emotive-Informative Pictures (173)
5.3.3 Primarily Informative Pictures (174)
5.4 The Informative Function of Pictures (175)
5.4.1 Background Information: Settings (176)
5.4.1.1 The Present-Day World (177)
5.4.1.2 Historical Settings (179)
5.4.1.3 Fantasy Settings (181)
5.4.1.4 “Invisible” Worlds (182)
5.4.1.5 Characters in Settings (182)
5.4.1.6 Characters in Action (183)
5.4.2 Procedures (184)
5.4.3 Objects (186)
5.4.4 Scientific Illustrations (186)
5.4.4.1 Including Scientific Illustrations as Pictures in the Picture (188)
5.4.4.2 Including Scientific Illustrations as Part of the Story (189)
5.4.4.3 Non-integrated Scientific Illustrations (192)
5.4.4.4 Mock-integration of Scientific Illustrations (194)
5.4.5 Picturing Details within a Sequence (195)
5.4.6 Visualising the Abstract and Using Visual Analogies (196)
5.4.7 Using Symbol Systems (199)
5.5 The Emotive Function of Pictures (199)
5.5.1 Characters (201)
5.5.1.1 Close-ups of Characters (202)
5.5.1.2 Social Interaction (205)
5.5.2 Emotive Settings (205)
5.5.3 Fun and Amusement (206)
5.5.4 Horror and Excitement (207)
5.5.5 Anthropomorphization (210)
5.5.6 Christian Iconography (212)
5.6 Expressive Means and Style (213)
5.7 Sources of Pictures (215)
5.7.1 Pictures Based on Paintings or Photographs (215)
5.7.2 Using Photographs as Pictures (217)
5.7.3 Other Sources (218)
Conclusion of Chapter Five (218)

6 Donor Genres 239
6.1 Genre: Definition Used (242)
6.2 Choosing Donor Genres (244)
6.2.1 Written Monologic Genres (245)
6.2.1.1 Biographies (246)
6.2.1.2 The Artistic-Expressive Biography (248)
6.2.1.3 The Scientist Hagiography (249)
6.2.2 Fact Banks (254)
6.2.3 Instructions and Other Step-by-Step Texts (255)
6.2.4 Comics Cookbooks (256)
6.2.5 Embedded Instructions (258)
6.3 Obituary (261)
6.3.1 Oral Monologic Genres (261)
6.3.2 Product Presentations (261)
6.3.3 Oral Dialogic Genres (263)
Conclusion of Chapter Six (238)

7 Lessons on Paper (263)
7.1 The Teacher Monologue (265)
7.1.1 The Impossible Teacher and the Independent Student (268)
7.2 Making the Students Think (269)
7.2.1 An Effdrt at Interactivity (271)
7.2.1.1 Words and Pictures (221)
7.2.1.2 Word-Image Relationships (222)
7.2.2 Combination of Informative, Emotive and Expressive Elements (224)
7.2.3 Information Density (225)
7.2.3.1 High-density Panels (226)
7.2.3.2 Middle-density Panels (226)
7.2.4 Low-density Panels (227)
7.3 Informative Picture, Informative Verbal Text (227)
7.3.1 Informative Picture, Emotive Verbal Text (229)
7.4 Emotive Picture, Emotive Verbal Text (229)
7.4.1 Emotive Picture, Informative Verbal Text (233)
7.4.1.1 Image-inherent Emotive Content (233)
7.4.1.2 Added Emotive Content (234)
7.4.1.3 Independent Emotive Content (236)
7.4.1.4 Emotive Content in Directional Deixis (237)
7.4.1.5 Teaching Classroom Language (272)
7.4.1.6 Classroom Behaviour (273)
7.4.2 Confidential Talks (274)
7.4.2.1 All-female Discourse: Some General Remarks (275)
7.4.2.2 All-male Discourse (282)
7.5 Verbal-visual genres (283)
7.5.1 TV genres (283)
7.5.1.1 The Animal Documentary and the WWF Comics Series (284)
7.5.2 Comics Journalism (288)
7.5.3 Language Teaching in Comics (292)
7.5.3.1 Comics in Language Teaching (292)
7.5.3.2 Language-teaching Comics (292)
7.5.3.3 Single Textbook Chapters in the Comics Format (297)
7.6 Mixed Genres and Embedded Genres (298)
7.6.1 Genre Change (299)
Conclusion of Chapter Seven (299)

8 The Narrative (301)
8.1 Narrative Structures (302)
8.2 Narrative Structures and Donor Genres (303)
8.3 Narrative versus Information (304)
8.4 Narratives and Text Length (305)
8.5 Narratives and Information Comic Types (305)
8.6 Functions of Narratives in Information Comics (307)
8.6.1 Adding Structure (307)
8.6.2 Adding Suspense (307)
8.7 Sample Donor Genres for the Narrative Structure (308)
8.7.1 The Fantastic Journey (308)
8.7.2 The Detective Story (309)
8.7.3 The Superhero Story (310)
8.7.4 Real-life Stories (311)
8.8 Repetitive Structures and Standing Characters (311)
8.9 Use of Narrative and Information Transfer: Sample Pages (312)
8.9.1 »Matz & Mikke« (312)
8.9.2 »Das Mofa-Projekt« (314)
8.9.3 The Weather Genie (316)
8.9.4 Troubled Waters (318)
8.9.5 The TarGits Get Pregnant (320)
8.9.6Fishing Fun Is Just around the Corner (321)
Conclusion of Chapter Eight (321)

Conclusion (323)
Bibliography: Primary Sources (327)
Bibliography (345)
Acknowledgements: Pictures (365)
Added by: joachim  Last edited by: joachim
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